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One step equations-multiplication

Whenever you solve a one step equation you are finding the value of the variable. The key to solving one step equations with multiplication is, whatever operation you perform on one side of the equation, you must also perform on the other side of the equation. Technically this is called " Inverse Operation" Let's look at some examples from the video.

Example 1
​2x = 10
Step 1 Divide both sides by the coefficient 2 Because there is not a mathmatical symbol between the 2 and the x it means multiplication and the inverse operation of multiplication is division.
2x/2 = 10/ 2

Step 2
x = 5   Because 2x/2=x  and 10/2 =5

Step 3 Plug the answer into the original equation to check your work.
2 x 5 =10  So it is correct


Example 2
4x = 12
Step 1 Divide both sides by the coefficient 4 Because there is not a mathmatical symbol between the 4 and the x  it means multiplication and the inverse operation of multiplication is division.
4x/4 = 12/4

Step 2

x = 3 Because 4x/4= x and 12/4 =3

Step 3 Plug the answer into the original equation to check your work.

4 x 3 = 12   Therefore... it is correct



Transcript
One step Equations with Multiplication
Today we are going to look at how to solve on step equations. We have 2x plus 10. To solve this vide both sides by two so X equals 5. Now let’s solve this in slow motion and I will explain it. We will start off with 2X =10 any time you have a number by an exponent it means multiplication so we will undo that using division. So we will divide each side by two. So two divided by two is just one and those cancel out so you just have 1X, but we don’t write the one, and the second half is 10 divided by 2 which is equal to five. Now we can always go back and check our answer and since X is equal to five I go back to the original equation of 2 times 5 is equal to 10 and that is a check and the correct answer.  

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